LPN to RN Salary Comparison & Job Outlook

Last Updated/Verified: Jan 14, 2020

The job outlook for RNs is strong. According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook (OOH) number of jobs available will increase by over 438,000 from 2016-2026. This is an increase of 19% which is faster than average for all jobs. The need for high quality nurses will increase due to high number of baby boomers and will be compounded by the current nursing shortage and the possible future shortage of Masters prepared nurses. Median yearly pay for RNs is $65,470. RN salary varies and can range from $40,000 to over $100,000 depending on place of employment, education level, and prior experience. Read more about finding a job after RN graduation.

LPN to RN programs are popular choices because they build on knowledge already obtained as a LPN. In addition, LPN bridge programs build on the experience obtained by working as a LPN. There is no substitute for experience. Stepping up the nursing ladder one step at a time is a great way to collect experience. Most LPN to RN bridge programs offer credit for LPN education or working experience. This may simply be awarded or the program will allow LPNs to "test out" of certain classes. This means if test scores are high enough on a certain subject exam, credit is received without taking the class. This varies from one LPN to RN bridge program to the next. Be sure to research this and find out the educational requirements. These programs also usually accept transfer credits from other colleges if applicable.

LPN to RN Salary Comparison

State LPN Annual Salary RN Annual Salary Percent Increase
Alabama 35,570 56,470 58.8%
Alaska 54,380 85,740 57.7%
Arizona 50,760 71,300 40.5%
Arkansas 36,040 56,480 56.7%
California 51,700 98,400 90.3%
Colorado 46,780 69,600 48.8%
Connecticut 55,170 76,370 38.4%
Delaware 47,700 70,160 47.1%
District of Columbia 52,680 80,040 51.9%
Florida 41,540 62,720 51.0%
Georgia 38,010 62,350 64.0%
Hawaii 46,520 88,230 89.7%
Idaho 39,430 60,320 53.0%
Illinois 44,870 68,030 51.6%
Indiana 40,580 58,900 45.1%
Iowa 38,750 54,020 39.4%
Kansas 39,460 56,800 43.9%
Kentucky 38,090 57,980 52.2%
Louisiana 37,810 60,230 59.3%
Maine 41,750 63,320 51.7%
Maryland 50,440 72,210 43.2%
Massachusetts 53,820 85,770 59.4%
Michigan 44,310 67,180 51.6%
Minnesota 42,000 71,450 70.1%
Mississippi 36,400 56,560 55.4%
Missouri 37,660 58,040 54.1%
Montana 38,760 61,810 59.5%
Nebraska 38,760 57,550 48.5%
Nevada 52,760 80,240 52.1%
New Hampshire 47,590 65,790 38.2%
New Jersey 52,950 78,330 47.9%
New Mexico 46,360 65,790 41.9%
New York 45,660 77,110 68.9%
North Carolina 41,730 60,030 43.9%
North Dakota 39,790 58,120 46.1%
Ohio 40,790 62,490 53.2%
Oklahoma 38,320 57,830 50.9%
Oregon 48,550 82,940 70.8%
Pennsylvania 43,550 66,570 52.9%
Rhode Island 52,110 75,510 44.9%
South Carolina 39,070 59,670 52.7%
South Dakota 35,210 53,970 53.3%
Tennessee 36,420 57,030 56.6%
Texas 44,880 68,590 52.8%
Utah 43,080 61,100 41.8%
Vermont 44,420 64,320 44.8%
Virginia 40,500 63,880 57.7%
Washington 49,220 78,540 59.6%
West Virginia 35,020 56,390 61.0%
Wisconsin 42,820 65,590 53.2%
Wyoming 43,300 60,790 40.4%

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, data extracted on February 18, 2016